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Mother Goose Potpourri

"Mother Goose" in Several Languages
The legend of Mother Goose is known in many countries.
In 1697 Charles Perrault used the phrase in a published collection of eight fairy tales. Although the book was titled, (translated from French) Histories and Tales of Long Ago, with Morals, the frontispiece showed an old woman spinning and telling stories, with a placard on the page which bore the words Contes de la Mere l'Oye ("Tales of My Mother the Goose"). Perrault thereby set the stage for the name to become a household word.

The single most important promoter of the designation of Mother Goose as writer of children's rhymes was John Newbery. With his adoption of her name for a collection of mostly traditional rhymes, he usurped her former alliance with the tales. The date for publication of this important little edition is agreed by scholars to be about 1765 (1760-1766). Mother Goose's Melody: or Sonnets for the Cradle gave us the designation "Mother Goose Rhymes" which took a firm hold. 
For more about these publications and just who Mother Goose was (and was not) see Who Was Mother Goose?
 

Dutch:  Moeder Ganz
Finnish:  Hanhiemo
French:  Oie de Mere;  me Mere l'Oye
German:  Mama Gansa;  Mutter Gans;
die Gänsamutter (the mother of the geese)
Hungarian:  Lud Anyó
Italian:  Oca di Madre
Portuguese:  Mamã Ganso;
Gánso de Mãre
Spanish:  Ganso de Madre
Swedish:  Gåsmer

Esperanto (the world language): 
Patrino Anser; Patrino Anserino

late 17th century handwritten with Puss-in-Boots
A page from a late Seventeenth Century
handwritten and illustrated version of
Charles Perrault's Contes de ma mère l'Oye
(Mother Goose Tales)
depicting "Puss in Boots."

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If you can offer better translations--or can provide the term in additional languages, please click the mailbox to e-mail your suggestion(s), with "Mother Goose Language" in the subject line. 
Most of those shown are from natives of the specific countries. 
The various dictionaries, however, are not effectively useful--though they give the translations for "mother" and "goose," they don't deal with how the term is used in reference to the fictional persona of "Mother Goose."

In many languages, words are reversed, or need a connecting article or preposition. Or certain capital letters are required.
If you can offer any language's terminology--readers of  this site would  be most grateful. Thank you for helping to give the world view.
 

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